art for a lonely heart
To imagine a language is to imagine a whole form of social life.


Credit: Eva Engelbert

After the monologue Cry Me A River Anna Mendelssohn now joins forces with the
performer Alex Deutinger on a venture into the difficult business of dialogue.
The duet art for a lonely heart investigates the role of language in love, democracy,
conflicts and relationships, searching for parallel, recurring themes on private and
geopolitical stages. The dialogues talk of intimacy, fear, tenderness, disappointment
and dependence, of power relations and power positions. How far can I trust the
language, the rhetoric, of the Other? What do we mean when we talk about reaching
an understanding or a consensus? How does our daily discourse influence political
discourse and vice versa? How dialogical does our democracy really function


Concept/Artistic Direction: Anna Mendelssohn
Performance: Alex Deutinger, Anna Mendelssohn
Directing: Yosi Wanunu 
Lights: Jan Maertens
Coproduced by: Tanzquartier Wien, Wiener Festwochen, Arena Festival (Erlangen)
Supported by: Kulturabteilung der Stadt Wien and bm:ukk 
And with support of: TURBO Impulstanz Residenz and PACT Zollverein (Essen).



From the Press: 

“In art for a lonely heart by Anna Mendelssohn the difficulty of listening takes
centre stage. The beginning is very simple: a man and woman sit opposite and
look at one another. With the sentence “What’s that look?” a dialogue unravels
which meanders from politics into the most intimate moments of a relationship.
Misunderstandings, misinterpretations of a carelessly spoken word charge up
the emotions and end in an icy silence.”

Christina Köppl, Wiener Zeitung, June 3rd 2011


“Anna Mendelssohn’s  art for a lonely heart captivates via an abstinence from
technical effects and a strong concentration on text and body language. In this
multi-layered, amusing dialogue with Alex Deutinger we are confronted also with
notions of reaction and positions of listening. Under Yosi Wanunu’s direction an
excellent, little theatre piece was construed in which contemporary dance manifests
itself in gestures, touch, and the facial expressions of the performers.”

Silvia Kargl, Kurier, June 2nd 2011


“...a dialogue of 55 min begins between the two performers - whirling ellipses
of bittersweet and kitschy love phrases, socially critical philosophical society
discourses, stereotypical love dramas, media-effective speeches of politicians,
rotate towards the latest disaster operations. The text consists of a montage
woven from TV appearances of leading politicians, thought processes of culture-
critical philosophers and quotes from Hollywood movies. The mood of the
performers changes as rapidly and yet seamlessly as the different topics of
conversation merge into one another. As positions alternate readily, repeat
themselves from the opposing perspective and are therefore negotiated afresh,
the relationship between real political statements and fictitious movie quotes
becomes more and more obscured. In this dialogical cross fire Mendelssohn is
less interested in the speech act and the truth or validity of the statements but
more in the seemingly passive activity of listening, which we are appearing to
loose more and more. …”

Andreas Fleck, Corpus, June 24th, 2011


“.. In a minimalistic setting Anna Mendelssohn focusses in on the nucleus of
communication: the dialogue between two people. Different constellations of
conversation are played out, from flirt to quarrel, from honed intellectual duels to
radical power games. We swiftly change from the private to the political and vice
versa. And in effect it is always about the personal, about advance and repel, attack
and defense. In a beautifully constructed rhythm and at times breathtaking tempo,
an infinite loop is designed under the direction of Yosi Wanunu, in which language is
almost everything and the most intimate moment of physical contact remains the
touch of the tip of a nose.”

Tiroler Tageszeitung, June 1st, 2011



Anna Mendelssohn



Anna Mendelssohn

Credit: Eva Engelbert  

Credit: Eva Engelbert  

Credit: Eva Engelbert   

Credit: Eva Engelbert  

Credit: Eva Engelbert